Brian P. Monk, P.E.
United Technologies Corporation
629 McCaffrey
Montreal, QC H4T 1N3
Canada
(514) 515-4822
Region: II
Honorarium: None

Brian Monk is National Sales Manager, responsible for Carrier Custom Air Handling Solutions, specializing in design of air treatment systems, including airborne contaminant control and dedicated outdoor air systems with energy recovery.

Mr. Monk is also an instructor for Carrier University’s Sustainability Symposiums under the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) program which provides CEU Credit for Professional Engineering Licensure.

His academic background comprises of a college degree in Applied Science (Building Systems Engineering Technology) from Vanier College of Montreal and a Bachelor of Building Engineering from Concordia University of Montreal. He is a Registered Professional Engineer with the Province of Quebec, Canada.

Mr. Monk is an ASHRAE Distinguished Lecturer, and Part-Time Professor in the Faculty of Building Engineering at Vanier College. He is also a member of the IAQA ( Indoor Air Quality Association).

Topics
Airborne Contaminant Control in Healthcare Environments

Health Care facility air conditioning plays an important role in patient therapy by controlling airborne microorganisms, viruses, and hazardous chemicals that may be present in the indoor environment. The nature of the health care environment requires that special attention at the design stage be considered to limit air movement between departments, dilute or remove air borne contaminants, and recognize that temperature / humidity conditions my vary in areas within the same building.

 

Health Care HVAC designers must consider the control of airborne infectious disease, room pressure relationships, and Outdoor Air Requirements (ASHRAE Standard 62.1) to meet Health Care Facility IAQ concerns. Complicating the dilution strategy are ASHRAE Standard 90.1 guidelines calling for higher efficiency in LEED / High Performing Building Design. The presentation will focus on infection sources, control measures, air movement and proper filtration techniques that can be designed into the building’s air handling system. An overview of anti-microbial construction techniques as they apply to dedicated outdoor air systems will also be discussed.

Design Concepts in DOAS: Balancing IAQ and Energy

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, in its current form, employs two procedures to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings.  These are the Ventilation Rate and IAQ Procedures.  This standard further endeavors to achieve the necessary balance between IAQ and energy consumption by specifying minimum ventilation rates and IAQ that will be acceptable to human occupants.

 

This presentation will focus on the design of Custom DOAS units with respect to providing adequate OA, and considering the IAQ procedure when the reduction of outdoor air pollutants is a concern. A system approach to combining DOAS units with chilled beam technology will be reviewed. Particular focus will be given to this combined strategy’s energy savings potential as it is applied to LEED EA credits.

Gas Phase Filtration for the Elimination of Corrosive, Odorous and Toxic Gases

The problem of corrosion in industrial environments such as refineries, pulp and paper plants and chemical factories is as old as industry itself.  Unlike hard corrosion that causes physical degradation of equipment, soft corrosion attacks the process control systems with minimal visual signs.  Operations managers have long realized that electronic components are at the mercy of the gases and acids that such environments contain.  As a result, corrosion of these components causes production stoppages, increased production costs, higher maintenance budgets and lower productivity.

For more than 35 years, the use of Gas Phase Filtration has been used in the reduction of gas phase contamination, more precisely, in controlling corrosion and odor potential in industrial environments, the use of granular activated carbon (GAC) and potassium permanganate has been built on years of research and development and on a growing number of satisfied customers worldwide.

This presentation will focus on an applied engineering unique systematic method, based on experience gathered from installations worldwide, which is effective for all types of industrial and commercial environments.  It comprises an integrated approach that utilizes four distinct stages (diagnose, measure, control, optimize) that can be undertaken progressively with each stage constituting an integral segment of the overall solution.

The Use of Gas-Phase Air Filtration and ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004, in its current form, employs two procedures to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings.  These are the Ventilation Rate and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedures.  This standard further endeavors to achieve the necessary balance between IAQ and energy consumption by specifying minimum ventilation rates and IAQ that will be acceptable to human occupants.

Whereas the Ventilation Rate Procedure provides only an indirect solution for the control of indoor contaminants, the IAQ Procedure provides a direct solution by reducing and controlling the concentrations of air contaminants, through air cleaning, to specified levels. The Standard acknowledges the air cleaning, along with recirculation, is an effective means for controlling contaminants when using the IAQ Procedure.

This presentation will focus on the use of gas-phase air filtration for compliance with Standard 62 when using the IAQ Procedure. It will cover requirements of using this procedure, the information required, and will describe several projects where this procedure was successfully applied.

IAQ in Airports

Increasing awareness about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and IAQ related issues (human comfort, human health, increased litigation) have caused many building codes and standards to address the real needs of occupants.  Prescriptive standards recommend minimum ventilation rates for acceptable IAQ as defined in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality but with the caveat that outdoor air (OA) must be of acceptable quality.

In this regard, airport applications present a unique and immediate concern to the health of many occupants.  Primarily, airport structures must contend with many of the internally generated contaminants found in commercial buildings.  Similarly, airports must also deal with many of the outdoor air contaminants associated with urban centers.  Finally, typical airport activities also contribute a large number of pollutants that can degrade the quality of outdoor air event further.

ASHRAE Standard 62, in its current form, employs two procedures to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings. These are the Ventilation Rate and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedures.  This standard further endeavors to achieve the necessary balance between IAQ and energy consumption by specifying minimum ventilation rates and IAQ that will be acceptable to human occupants.

This presentation will focus on the use of gas-phase air filtration to specifically address many of the problems encountered in modern airports.  It will cover the requirements for using this procedure, the information required, and it will describe several projects where this procedure was successfully implemented.

Current Trends in Design and Installation of Filtration Systems for Building HVAC Security

Nationwide, HVAC designers have recently included more outside air, up to 60 cfm/person, to meet IAQ concerns through dilution.  Complicating the dilution strategy are ASHRAE 90.1 guidelines calling for higher efficiency in building design.  As a result, costly heat exchange devices have become prevalent.  Since September 11th, though, the use of outside air has taken on a darker element as designers are asked to protect buildings from potential terrorist attacks that could come in the form of toxic gases released into a building air intake system.

Additionally, 20-60 cfm of untreated air presents air quality problems where heavy smog exists such as hospitals near freeways. Further, the possibility of a terrorist exposing the occupants to a simple gas such as chlorine or a virus such as anthrax makes the use of dilution potentially all the more hazardous.  Large office buildings, airports, government labs, stadium arenas and other buildings containing large crowds or key societal functions are susceptible to such an attack.

The presentation will explore air-cleaning methods that can complement dilution and can serve as an alternative for building protection.

Dehumidification and Air Quality in Indoor Pool Environments

This topic has been studied for many years and at present, there is a growing concern related to the potential ill-effects of chloramine compounds that are released in the pool space.  Air distribution techniques and humidity control play an important role and specific gas filters designed for airborne chlorine compound reduction can also be employed at the design stage.

Environmental and Emissions Filtration in Waste Water Treatment Facilities

Air quality and safety are of particular concern when designing a Waste Water Treatment Facility. Water purification is generally considered to be the main focus for designers and engineers specializing in this type of application, however there is a growing concern with respect to the quality of the air surrounding the facility. Hydrogen Sulfide, Mercaptans, and Organic compounds are often emitted in high concentrations and must be suppressed at the source, before they are allowed to create environmental concerns.

Safe levels of these gases need to be maintained within the pump station, wet / dry well areas, de-watering stations and headworks sectors of the WWTP, therefore adequate make-up air must be designed into the airside system. The presentation will address the airside design concerns within the facilities as well as outdoor environmental emissions concerns. An overview of existing air purification technologies, their application and design limitations will also be discussed.

Emergency Air filtration and Air Pollution Control for Water Treatment Plants

Air purification systems are typically designed to handle steady state contaminant expectations. In Water Treatment Plants, particularly where strong sanitization agents are used, such as Chlorine, the risk of an accidental release to the environment requires special attention. In many jurisdictions, designers are required to follow the Uniform Fire Code with respect to the handling of transient loads of  toxic agents.

The assumptions are that a leak or complete release of a toxic agent could be experienced within the storage facility at any given time. The presentation will discuss current methods used to minimize the risk and meet local code requirements when an accidental release of chemical agents occurs. Storage room ventilation strategies and emergency air filtration technologies will also be discussed.

Filtration for High Performing Buildings

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004, in its current form, employs two procedures to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings.  These are the Ventilation Rate and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedures.  This standard further endeavors to achieve the necessary balance between IAQ and energy consumption by specifying minimum ventilation rates and IAQ that will be acceptable to human occupants. Air Handling Unit design requires that proper selection of air filters be considered to not only maintain adequate IAQ, but minimize static pressure drop and therefore AHU operations cost.

Nationwide, HVAC designers have recently included more outside air, up to 60 cfm/person, to meet IAQ concerns through dilution. Complicating the dilution strategy are ASHRAE 90.1 guidelines calling for higher efficiency in building design. Recently, the use of outside air has taken on a more serious element, as designers are asked to protect buildings from potential “extraordinary circumstances” that could come in the form of chemical or biological contaminant released close to a building air intake system.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Outline specific sections of ASHRAE Standard 62.1 as it applies to building filtration.
  2. Identify various AHU design strategies that can comply with ASHRAE 90.1 as it pertains to building filtration.
  3. Review the predominant filtration technologies that can be incorporated into central station AHU’s to minimize Particulate, Chemical and Biological contaminants.
  4. Evaluate methods of reducing life-cycle cost without sacrificing adequate air purification.
  5. Explore air cleaning methods that compliment dilution and can serve as a means of saving energy and protecting the occupied space.
Additional presentations available:
IAQ and Cognitive Functioning in High Performing Buildings

Achieving balance among desired goals for indoor air quality (IAQ), energy consumption, and occupant comfort within the built environment is challenging. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) endeavors to achieve this through guidelines and standards focused on advancing building science as it relates to environmental quality. This article will review the commonly used design guides found in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1, “Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.” The current form of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1 employs two mechanical ventilation procedures to provide acceptable IAQ in buildings: the Ventilation Rate Procedure and the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure. While the Ventilation Rate Procedure provides only a dilution solution for the control of typical offending contaminants for a specified occupancy, the IAQ Procedure provides a directed approach by reducing and controlling the concentrations of selected air contaminants of concern through both dilution and enhanced air cleaning.

Rather than relying only on diluting the concentration of contaminants with outdoor air, designing with enhanced filtration of both recirculated and ventilation outdoor air can improve IAQ and result in the protection of the occupied space. This newsletter will focus on the application of enhanced particle, gas-phase and biological filtration for compliance with Standard 62.1. An outline of the design aspects to consider will be reviewed, with the focus on achieving acceptable levels of contaminants of concern within the occupied space while considering the desire to meet high-performance building standards.