Kishor Khankari, Ph.D., Fellow ASHRAE
President
AnSight LLC
3814 Mill Pond Lane
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
United States
(734) 327-4079
Region: V
Honorarium: None

Dr. Kishor Khankari, Ph.D. is President at AnSight LLC in Ann Arbor, MI. He provides engineering solutions and insights through Physics based simulations and analyses. Kishor has several years of experience in providing optimized HVAC solutions to a wide variety of applications involving external wind engineering, plume dispersion, smoke exhaust, displacement ventilation, natural ventilation, radiant heating and cooling, and indoor air quality and thermal comfort optimization for office spaces, patient rooms, operating rooms, cleanrooms, justice facilities, data centers, and warehouses. Dr. Khankari has developed a patented technology of a wind band design of exhaust fan assembly systems. He has developed several easy-to-use analytical software tools which are regularly used by design engineers in a variety companies including those in HVAC industry, critical facilities, and automotive industries. A noted expert in his field, he has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and has been regularly published in several technical journals and trade magazines. Dr. Khankari is an eloquent speaker and has made more than 100 DL presentations worldwide on topics related to design and optimization of HVAC systems.

Dr. Kishor Khankari is a Fellow member of ASHRAE. He is a recipient of ASHRAE Exceptional and Distinguished Service Awards. He is serving on ASHRAE Board as a Director-At-Large (DAL). He is the past President of Detroit ASHRAE Chapter. He is past Chair of ASHRAE Technical Committee TC9.11 Clean Spaces and past Chair of Research Administration Committee (RAC) at national level. He is currently leading a new ASHRAE Multi Task Group (MTG) on Air Change Rates. He is a voting member of Member of the ASHRAE Infectious Aerosols Position Document (PD) Committee and the the ASHRAE Standards Project Committee SPC 129 – Measuring Air Exchange Effectiveness.

Topics
Design and Analysis of Natural Ventilation Systems

A good design of a natural ventilation system maintains harmony between the local climates, space sensible heat loads, and the design of operable openings (windows). Poorly designed systems can perform miserably even in the best climatic conditions. Several factors such as building orientation, building massing, effective opening areas and their locations, relative height differences, internal heat loads, furniture and seating arrangement within the occupied spaces can affect the performance of natural ventilation systems. This presentation will discuss basics of natural ventilation and with the help of case studies demonstrate how basic analyses can help predict number of hot and comfortable hours for occupants and how to optimize the performance of natural ventilation designs.

Stratified Air Ventilation Systems

Displacement ventilation systems which are also referred as “stratified air distribution systems” work on the principle of thermal buoyancy – hot air due to lower density rises above the cold air. Stratified distribution systems are becoming popular due to their ability to provide better indoor air quality with low energy demand. Stratified air distribution systems come mainly in two flavors – traditional displacement ventilation (TDV) systems and the under floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. This presentation will cover the basics of stratified air distribution systems and discuss various design and operational parameters that affect their performance.

Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Built Environment

Air is the primary carrier of heat, moisture, and contaminants in and around built environments. Airflow patterns determine the distribution of temperature, contaminant level, and importantly air quality and thermal comfort of occupants. System level HVAC designs cannot envision the potential risks due to poor airflow distribution. Such risks are realized only after commissioning and occupancy of the buildings. This presentation will show how Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can help in identification and mitigation of such risks at early stages in the design. After providing a brief introduction to CFD, this presentation with the help of several case studies will show application of CFD to a wide variety of scenarios involving displacement ventilation, active and passive chilled beams, airflow patterns in enclosed spaces, radiant heating and cooling, smoke propagation in atria, clean rooms, data centers, patient rooms, plume dispersion from cooling towers, and several other situations related to built environment.

Airflow Management Best Practices for Data Centers

Airflow management within data centers is crucial for proper cooling and energy efficiency of data centers. Proper selection as well as proper placement of various data center equipment such as CRACs, perforated tiles, and racks play an important role in airflow distribution and cooling performance of data centers. This presentation will focus on basics of data center cooling and principles of air movement in data centers and show how it can be used in assessing and improving the cooling performance of their data centers.

Airflow Management for Healthcare Facilities

Air is the primary carrier of heat, moisture, and contaminants in health care facilities such as patient rooms, isolation rooms, and operating rooms. The flow path of supply air plays an important role in determining the air velocities, air temperatures, concentration of contaminants, and path of airborne pathogens in these spaces. These factors in turn determine thermal comfort of occupants, indoor air quality, and potential for transmission of airborne pathogens. This presentation will focus on the importance of HVAC configuration on airflow distribution and flow path of airborne contaminants in patient rooms and operating rooms. In addition, this presentation will cover the applications of active chilled beams, radiant heating and cooling, and displacement ventilation in patient rooms.

Airflow Management for Laboratory Facilities

Air is the primary carrier of heat, moisture, and contaminants in laboratory facilities. The flow path of supply air plays an important role in determining the air velocities, air temperatures, concentration of contaminants, and path of contaminants in laboratories. Often high airflow rates or air change rates per hour (ACH) for laboratory spaces are specified to cover the risk of chemical exposure. Although high supply airflow rates can reduce the overall concentration of contaminants it may not ensure uniformity of concentrations at a low diluted level. Importantly, locations of high concentration, especially those in the breathing zone of occupants can pose potentially higher exposure risk. This presentation will focus on the importance of HVAC configuration on airflow distribution and flow path of contaminants in laboratories. In addition, this presentation will cover basics of air ventilation for laboratories and flow dynamics of fume hoods.

Basics of Air Change Rates (ACH): Facts versus Fiction
Air Changes per Hour (ACH) is often specified in ASHRAE standards, codes, design guidelines, and handbooks for required ventilation rate. Examples of such spaces are patient rooms, operating room, bathrooms, cleanroom, and laboratories. This presentation will systematically demonstrate the validity of popular notions regarding the ACH. The role of space volume in controlling and distributing the contaminant in the space will be discussed. This presentation will further demonstrate whether ACH can be a sole criterion for effective ventilation of critical spaces using the examples for patient room, hospital operating room, laboratory spaces, and cleanroom. A new concept for analyzing ventilation effectiveness for these spaces will be introduced to design and optimize the HVAC layout for healthcare, laboratory, and cleanroom facilities. In addition, a role of demand control ventilation in minimizing the ACH will be discussed. This lecture will provide valuable insights to architects, design engineers, and facilities managers into the design and operation of critical facilities.
Airflow Management for Cleanroom Facilities
Clean spaces are developed for a variety of applications including healthcare, aerospace, microelectronics, pharmaceutical, food and beverages. The main goal of cleanroom application is to maintain high level of cleanliness in the spaces to minimize any cross contamination. Air is the primary carrier of heat, moisture, and contaminants in cleanroom facilities. The flow path of supply air plays an important role in determining the air velocities, air temperatures, particle concentration, and flow path of airborne particles. These factors in turn determine the level of cleanliness and distribution of contaminants in the space. This presentation will first cover basics of cleanroom classifications, and sources of contaminants, and then, will focus on the importance of HVAC configuration on airflow distribution and resulting flow path of airborne particles in cleanroom that affect the contaminant removal effectives. In addition, this presentation will also cover role of Air Changes per Hour (ACH), demand control ventilation, cleanroom airlocks, and dynamics of laminar diffusers in cleanrooms.
Compassion in HVAC Designs (NEW)
ASHRAE’s mission is “to serve humanity by advancing the arts and sciences of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration and their allied fields” and the vison is “a healthy and sustainable built environment for all.” The question is how can we achieve this mission and vision? Can “human-centric” HVAC designs be created by simply following the building codes and standards? Can energy efficient buildings be also effective in creating healthy, comfortable, and productive indoor environments? In addition to these questions this presentation will answer why compassion is important during the design process to create “human-centric” HVAC designs. This presentation will demonstrate how advanced analysis techniques can help achieve ASHRAE’s mission.
Analysis of Airflow Patterns and Flow Path of Airborne Contaminants
Recent COVID-10 pandemic necessitates an increased need for understanding the room airflow patterns and its role in containing and spreading of airborne contaminants. With air being the primary carrier of heat, moisture, and airborne contaminants the flow path of supply air plays an important role in determining the flow path of airborne contaminants in indoor facilities. This course covers the basics of airflow and particle dynamics and demonstrates how the supply air flow paths, induced air flow paths, and exhaust grille placement can work collaboratively to establish protective and effective contaminant control in a typical patient room. Several studies indicate that the design of a ventilation system and the resulting airflow patterns play a more important role in controlling the flow path of airborne contaminants than just the supply airflow rate or air changes per hour (ACH) alone. This case study evaluates the impact of supply and return locations on the airflow patterns and temperature distribution along with the resulting thermal comfort of occupants. Probable flow path of airborne particulates in a typical patient room using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are demonstrated. Insightful airflow animations will show the movement of airborne particles for various applications displaying the importance of HVAC design including the locations of supply and exhaust grilles. The course provides valuable insights to HVAC design engineers, facility managers, infection prevention personnel, and building owners regarding the role of airflow patterns and resulting flow path of airborne contaminants.